The immigration lawyers at Richards and Jurusik Immigration Law have more than 20 years of experience helping foreign nationals from all over the world work and live in the United States.

We provide comprehensive immigration support to individuals looking to work and live in the US, assisting with everything from temporary work visas to US permanent residency (Green Cards) and US Citizenship.

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Work Authorization

Are you looking for a Temporary Work Visa? We can help.

Depending on your country of citizenship, education level, and employment opportunities, there are many possible employment-based nonimmigrant visa categories that provide temporary work authorization to work and live in the US.

H-1B Visas for Specialty Occupations, DOD Cooperative Research & Development Project Workers, and Fashion Models

Foreign nationals who wish to perform services in a specialty occupation, services of exceptional merit and ability relating to a Department of Defense (DOD) cooperative research and development project, or services as a fashion model of distinguished merit or ability, can apply for the H-1B Visa.

O-1 Visas for Individuals with Extraordinary Ability

Foreign nationals who possess extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics, or who have a demonstrated record of extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry and has been recognized nationally or internationally for those achievements, can apply for an O-1 Visa.

Other Temporary Work Visas

We also help foreign nationals with all other relevant temporary work visas, including:

  • CW-1 Visas for CNMI-Only Transitional Workers (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands)
  • E-3 Visas for Specialty Occupation Workers from Australia
  • H-1B1 Visas for Specialty Occupations from Chile & Singapore
  • H-2A Visas for Temporary Agricultural Workers
  • H-2B Visas for Temporary Non-Agricultural Workers
  • H-3 Visas for Nonimmigrant Trainees or Special Education Exchange Visitors
  • I Visas for Representatives of Foreign Media
  • P-1A Visas for Athletes
  • P-1B Visas for Members of an Internationally Recognized Entertainment Group
  • P-2 Visas for Individual Performers or Part of a Group Entering to Perform Under a Reciprocal Exchange Program
  • P-3 Visas for Artists or Entertainers Coming to Be Part of a Culturally Unique Program
  • R-1 Visas for Nonimmigrant Religious Workers

International Traders & Investors

Do you have substantial trade or investments in the US? We can help.

If you are a foreign national from a country with which the US maintains a treaty of commerce, and you either conduct substantial trade with or have substantial investments in a new or existing enterprise in the United States, you may qualify for an E Visa.

E-1 Visas for Treaty Traders

Foreign businesses from treaty countries that conduct substantial trade with the United States are able to obtain an E-1 registration for their business that enables them to send qualifying employees to the US on E-1 Visas.

E-2 Visas for Treaty Investors

Foreign citizens and businesses from treaty countries with substantial investments in the United States are able to obtain an E-2 registration for their business that enables them to send qualifying employees to the US on E-2 Visas.

Business Owners

Looking to expand your business into the United States? We can help.

If you are a foreign company that has not yet established operations in the United States, you (or certain employees of your company) may qualify for an L-1 Visa.

L-1 Visas for Business Expansion into the United States

Foreign businesses that are looking to expand their footprint into the United States can do so under the L-1 Visa for Intracompany Transfers, which allows for the start-up of a new business and the transfer of qualifying employees to the US to establish, set up, manage, run, and/or work in the new office.

US Permanent Residence (Green Cards)

Looking for a Green Card through employment sponsorship? We can help.

If you’re a foreign national looking to live and work in the United States as a permanent resident, we can help.

A permanent resident is someone who has been granted authorization to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. As proof of that status, a person is granted a permanent resident card, commonly called a “green card.” Take a look at the possible paths to permanent residence through employment for you.

Looking for a Green Card through US family sponsorship? We can help.

The US immigration system allows for the sponsorship of certain qualifying immediate family members of US citizens and US permanent residents.

If your spouse, parent, adult child, or adult sibling is a US citizen or US permanent resident, US permanent residency through a family member may be an option for you.

Green Cards for Spouses

If you are a Canadian citizen married to a US citizen, they can petition on your behalf for a green card and permanent residence.

Green Cards for Family

If you are a Canadian citizen and a qualifying family member of a US citizen or permanent resident, they can petition on your behalf for permanent residence.

K-1 Visas for Fiancés or Fiancées

If you are a Canadian citizen engaged to a US citizen, your fiancé or fiancée can petition on your behalf to obtain a K-1 Visa to enter the US for the purpose of marriage.

Immigrant & Non-immigrant Visa (NIV) Waivers

Are you an immigrant or non-immigrant that has been found to be inadmissible to the United States? We can help.

There are times when persons are found to be inadmissible to the United States for previous criminal arrests, misrepresentation, or fraud (among other reasons). The immigration laws allow for waivers of those inadmissibilities for both immigrant and non-immigrant reasons.

For persons that may only be seeking to enter the United States for a temporary non-immigrant purpose such as to visit, study, or work, their prior history may prevent them from being admitted into the United States. If you have been refused entry to the United States and have been found inadmissible, you might need a waiver.

Our Resources for Waivers

Arrive US Immigration Law Podcast – Episode 33 – Border Denials and Refusals under INA 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(I) for lack of documents and immigrant intent
Arrive US Immigration Law Podcast – Episode 33 – Border Denials and Refusals under INA 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(I) for lack of documents and immigrant intent
In the most recent episode of the Arrive Podcast, we discuss Border Denials and Refusals under INA 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(I) here. for lack of documents and immigrant intent. This type of denial is common for those trying to both visit and work in the United States. We review why these denials happen and how to overcome them.
My visa application was refused under section 221(g), now what?
My visa application was refused under section 221(g), now what?
A visa application refusal under 221(g) is somewhat common and can happen for a number of reasons. In general, 221(g) means that the reviewing officer would like further information before making a final decision on your case. We discuss the meaning of a refusal under 221(g) and what you need to do here.
I was denied entry to the United States under 212(a)(6)(C)(i), do I need a waiver?
I was denied entry to the United States under 212(a)(6)(C)(i), do I need a waiver?
If when seeking entry to the United States you make false statements or willfully misrepresented material facts to seek admission or obtain a visa, you can be found inadmissible. If you have been found inadmissible to the United States under 212(a)(6)(C)(i) for fraud or misrepresentation, you cannot enter without a waiver of inadmissibility. We discuss how to obtain a waiver for fraud or misrepresentation under 212(a)(6)(C)(i) here.

Deportation & Removal Defense

Are you facing removal or deportation from the United States? We can help.

Removal defense (formerly called “deportation defense”) involves representing and advocating for immigrants facing removal or deportation from the United States.

For many immigrants, the process involves appearing before an immigration judge in immigration court. While most immigrants cannot afford to have an attorney represent them in court, legal representation is sadly the single most important factor in determining whether someone will win—or lose—their case.

US Citizenship & Naturalization

Are you looking to become a US citizen? We can help.

Contact Richards and Jurusik Immigration Law today if you have questions about your eligibility for naturalization, or you are in need of assistance with the naturalization process. We routinely help qualifying persons apply for US citizenship—even attending interviews with our clients.

Citizenship can be obtained through birth in the US, birth to a US citizen, or through naturalization. In some cases, you might already be a US citizen.

Do I qualify for US Citizenship?

Find out whether you meet the requirements to apply for US citizenship.

How do I apply for US citizenship?

Learn about USCIS Form N-400, which is used to apply for US citizenship through naturalization.

Can you help me apply for US citizenship?

Richards and Jurusik have extensive experience helping people like you apply for US citizenship.

Affirmative Asylum

Are you looking to apply for asylum in the United States? We can help.

Many people around the world have to flee their countries of birth due to being targeted because of their race, nationality, political opinion, or being a part of a particular group of people.

If you are in the United States, you can apply for protection in the form of an application for affirmative asylum.

Board of Immigration Appeals

Are you seeking assistance with your Board of Immigration Appeals case? We can help.

The Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA or Board) is the highest administrative body for interpreting and applying United States immigration laws.

In general, the BIA reviews appeals from certain decisions that Immigration Judges and district directors of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issue, ensuring that the immigration laws receive a fair and uniform application. Filing an appeal with the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) is a crucial step for many noncitizens facing removal because it is the last opportunity to obtain a favorable decision from the Executive Office for Immigration Review.

Our Immigration Resources

How do I get TN Visa status as an Astronomer?
How do I get TN Visa status as an Astronomer?
The profession of an Astronomer is listed under the USMCA(NAFTA) professions list as a profession that qualifies for TN visa status. If you are a Canadian or Mexican Citizen with an offer of employment from a US employer as an Astronomer, you might qualify to work and live in the US under TN Visa status. We discuss the profession of Astronomer for TN Visa status under the USMCA and how to qualify here.
How do I get TN Visa status as an Apiculturist (Beekeeper)?
How do I get TN Visa status as an Apiculturist (Beekeeper)?
The profession of an Apiculturist (Beekeeper)  is listed under the USMCA(NAFTA) professions list as a profession that qualifies for TN visa status. If you are a Canadian or Mexican Citizen with an offer of employment from a US employer as an Apiculturist, you might qualify to work and live in the US under TN Visa status. We discuss the profession of an Apiculturist for TN Visa status under the USMCA and how to qualify here.
How do I get TN Visa status as a Technical Publications Writer?
How do I get TN Visa status as a Technical Publications Writer?
The profession of Technical Publications Writer is listed under the USMCA(NAFTA) professions list as a profession that qualifies for TN visa status. If you are a Canadian or Mexican Citizen with an offer of employment from a US employer, you might qualify to work and live in the US under TN Visa status. We discuss the profession of a Technical Publications Writer for TN Visa status under the USMCA and how to qualify here.
I was laid off or fired while on an H1B visa, now what?
I was laid off or fired while on an H1B visa, now what?
Depending on the circumstances, an H1B Visa holder that loses their employment or fails to renew before it expires might be eligible for a grace period allowing them to remain in the US while they take action to preserve their legal status. But there are a lot of rules to consider, and breaking the rules could mean "unlawful presence." We discuss being laid off or fired while on an H1B visa and what to do here.
As an employer, what do I need to know about H1B Visa extensions and renewals?
As an employer, what do I need to know about H1B Visa extensions and renewals?
The initial term for an H1B Visa is up to 3 years. After the initial 3-year term, an H1B visa may be extended or renewed for one additional 3-year term for a maximum stay of 6 years in H1B visa status. an extension of H1B visa status is obtained the same way as the initial H1B visa, by filing Form I-129 Petition for Alien Worker with USCIS.  We review the H-1B Visa extension and renewal process here. 
What are the TN Visa Degree Requirements?
What are the TN Visa Degree Requirements?
Degree requirements for TN Visa status are set forth in the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement, formerly NAFTA. Requirements can vary based on profession and are specific to the countries in the agreement. In addition, alternative degree requirements can be used for some TN visa professions. If you were not educated in the United States, Canada, or Mexico, this can make determining your qualifications for TN Visa status complicated. We discuss the specific TN Visa degree requirements under the USMCA here.
B visa for Voluntary Service for a Non-profit or Religious Organization
B visa for Voluntary Service for a Non-profit or Religious Organization
Visitors to the United States (B Visa) can enter for many reasons. Citizens of most foreign countries require a visitor visa prior to entry while some foreign nationals are visa-exempt or can participate in the visa waiver program. In any case, prior to entry to the United States as a visitor, you need to be certain that your intended activities fall within the limits of the B visa. We discuss entering the United States as a volunteer for a non-profit or religious organization below.
How do I qualify for TN Visa status as a Teacher?
How do I qualify for TN Visa status as a Teacher?
Of the several listed professions under the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), three professions fall under the category of teacher. These include College Teachers, Seminary Teachers, and University Teachers.  Typically referred to as postsecondary teachers. This does not include primary or secondary school teachers. We discuss the profession of a Teacher for TN Visa status under the USMCA and how to qualify here.
What is an invitation letter for US Visitor visa (B1/B2), and how do I write one?
What is an invitation letter for US Visitor visa (B1/B2), and how do I write one?
If you have a friend or family member coming from another country to visit you in the United States, you might be asked to write an invitation letter. Although not a requirement, an invitation letter from a US citizen or legal permanent resident (LPR), can strengthen your B visa application.  Invitation letters are helpful because they detail that you will have a place to stay, sufficient financial support, and a definitive departure date. We discuss invitation letters for  US visitor visas here.
B Visa for Clerkships and Internships
B Visa for Clerkships and Internships
Visitors to the United States (B Visa) can enter for many reasons. Citizens of most foreign countries require a visitor visa prior to entry while some foreign nationals are visa-exempt or can participate in the visa waiver program. In any case, prior to entry to the United States as a visitor, you need to be certain that your intended activities fall within the limits of the B visa. We discuss entering the United States for clerkships and internships below.