Understanding Your Combo Card: Travel and Work Benefits

Understanding Your Combo Card: Travel and Work Benefits

If you have applied for U.S. permanent residency (a Green card) through adjustment of status, you might have also requested a Combination Employment Authorization and Advance Parole Card, commonly known as the combo card. This article will help you understand the dual functionality of this card and your work and travel options while your permanent residency application is pending.

Meeting USCIS Business Requirements for U.S. Employers

Meeting USCIS Business Requirements for U.S. Employers

Understanding U.S. immigration law requirements, particularly about employment-based visas like the H-1B, and understanding what constitutes a “U.S. employer” according to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is crucial. For businesses seeking to employ foreign nationals under such visas, meeting these standards is the first step toward a successful petition. We explain the definition of a U.S. employer for immigration purposes here. 

VAWA Green Card Pathway for Immigrant Abuse Victims

VAWA Green Card Pathway for Immigrant Abuse Victims

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) offers a pathway for immigrants who are victims of abuse by certain U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents to seek safety and stability in the form of a U.S. Green Card. Here’s an overview of the eligibility requirements and the application process for navigating this delicate situation.

Public Benefits’ Impact on Nonimmigrant Visas

Public Benefits’ Impact on Nonimmigrant Visas

For nonimmigrant visa holders in the United States, understanding which public benefits you are eligible for—and how receiving these benefits might affect your visa status—is crucial. Nonimmigrant visa categories encompass various purposes, including tourism, business, study, and temporary work. The eligibility for public benefits among nonimmigrant visa holders is limited, reflecting the temporary nature of their stay in the U.S. This post explains the benefits nonimmigrant visa holders can and cannot receive and the impact on their visa status.

Immigrant Visa Steps: NVC Documentarily Qualified Status

Immigrant Visa Steps: NVC Documentarily Qualified Status

Becoming a U.S. immigrant is a process with various stages and documentation. Receiving a notice that your Immigrant Visa Case has become Documentarily Qualified marks a significant milestone in this journey. This blog post will help you understand what this status means, prepare for your embassy interview, and determine what steps you should follow next.

Understanding Immigrant Classes of Admission to the U.S.

Understanding Immigrant Classes of Admission to the U.S.

Becoming a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR), or “green card” holder, marks the start of a new chapter of opportunities in the United States. This status allows individuals to live and work anywhere within the country and paves the way for them to apply for U.S. citizenship, given that they meet specific criteria. The journey to LPR status navigates through various classes of admission as outlined by the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). This article examines these classes and avenues, such as family reunification, economic contributions, humanitarian grounds, and diversity visas, and examples of each class.

Understanding the NVC Document Collection Process

Understanding the NVC Document Collection Process

Are you ready to take the next step toward a U.S. visa?  The National Visa Center (NVC) contacts you by e-mail to indicate that it’s time to begin the document collection phase of the immigrant visa process. This stage involves submitting various forms, documents, and fees required for your visa appointment and interview scheduling. Understanding this process can be confusing; we break it down into simple steps here.